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 5.9 Environment and Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)

 
 

 Requirements

 

R1. Governing Regulations and Policy

Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding environmental safety and occupational health.

R2. Occupational Safety and Health Program

Center operators must establish and operate an Occupational Safety and Health program in accordance with the requirements established in this section. The center’s program must fully comply with current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards at 29 CFR 1904, 1910, 1926, and 1960, and with U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) regulations, policies, and procedures. It must include, but not be limited by, the following features:

a. Appointment of a center Safety Officer who is properly trained in OSHA courses listed in Exhibit 5-4 (Required Staff Training)

b. Development of an Occupational Safety and Health Plan, which is updated as needed or as directed by OSHA or the Office of Job Corps (see Chapter 5, Section 5.1, R15). 

c. Investigation and reporting of accidents and injuries

d. Enforcement of safety and health rules and regulations

e. Conduct of safety inspections and initiation of corrective actions

f. Development of a safety recognition program

g. Establishment of Occupational Safety and Health Committees

R3. Center Occupational Safety and Health Responsibilities and Duties

a. General Responsibilities

The center operator must be responsible for safeguarding the occupational safety and health of all students and staff and ensuring a safe and healthful environment in which to live, work, and train. This responsibility will be inherent in all aspects of the program, whether stated explicitly or implied.

b. Center Operating Contractors and Federal Agencies Center operating contractors and agencies must:

1. Ensure a training, living, and working environment that is free from recognized hazards.

2. Ensure that the Center Director is an active participant on the Occupational Safety and Health Committee.

3. Appoint a center Safety Officer and provide necessary training and equipment for the performance of those duties. The center Safety Officer will report directly to the Center Director on matters of safety.

4. Ensure that the Center Director or designee (e.g., Safety Officer) has the authority to terminate any activity where a hazard exists.

5. Enforce occupational health and safety rules, regulations, and standards.

6. Ensure that Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is worn in the trade programs to comply with OSHA standards.

7. Report fatalities, injuries, and occupational illnesses to DOL in a timely manner and use the Significant Incident Reporting (SIR) System appropriately.

8. Instruct students and staff in safe practices and methods of operation.

9. Conduct required occupational health and safety inspections and surveys and take prompt corrective action to deal with hazards identified.

10. Provide medical and dental services and supplies for injured and occupationally ill students.

11. Investigate accidents, complete and submit appropriate reports.

12. Encourage and evaluate student suggestions on safety and health improvements.

13. Develop and implement a safety awards and recognition program.

14. Ensure that safety and health evaluation reports provided by the Office of Job Corps are responded to within 30 days of receipt and that corrective action is taken to abate hazards noted.

c. Center Director

The Center Director must:

1. Ensure that all occupational safety and health requirements are implemented.

2. Provide leadership, direction, enforcement, and accountability for the center safety program.

3. Develop a center Occupational Safety and Health program and plan.

4. Ensure that personal protective equipment (PPE) is worn in the trade programs to comply with OSHA standards.

5. Ensure a training, living, and working environment that is free from recognized hazards. Maintain facilities and grounds in a sanitary and healthful manner.

6. Participate in all Occupational Safety and Health Committee meetings.

7. Appoint a center Safety Officer and provide necessary training and equipment for the performance of those duties. The center Safety Officer will report directly to the Center Director on matters of safety.

8. Terminate any activity where a hazard exists; additionally, the authority to terminate any such hazardous activity may be given to a designee (e.g., Safety Officer).

9. Enforce occupational health and safety rules, regulations, and standards.

10. Report fatalities, injuries, and occupational illnesses to OSHA and Division of Facilities and Maintenance (DFAM) in a timely manner and use the Significant Incident Reporting (SIR) System appropriately.

11. Instruct students and staff in safe practices and methods of operation.

12. Conduct required occupational health and safety inspections and surveys and take prompt corrective action to deal with hazards identified.

13. Ensure medical and dental services are provided and provide supplies for injured and occupationally ill students.

14. Investigate accidents and complete and submit appropriate reports.

15. Encourage and evaluate student suggestions on safety and health improvements.

16. Establish a formal written safety awards and recognition program, and use it to recognize students and staff who make significant contributions toward the prevention of injury or illness.

17. Review safety awards and recognition programs annually.

18. Ensure that safety and health evaluation reports provided by the Office of Job Corps are responded to within 30 days of receipt and that corrective action is taken to abate hazards noted.

d. Center Safety Officer

The center Safety Officer must:

1. Assist the Center Director in preparing the center Occupational Safety and Health Plan and implement the plan.

2. Provide orientation and training to students and staff on the center Safety and Health Plan.

3. Promote safety campaigns on center to reduce accidents and injuries.

4. Inspect all center areas for safety and health violations.

5. Ensure that personal protective equipment (PPE) is worn in the trade programs to comply with OSHA standards.

6. Complete all required accident and injury reports in full compliance with the PRH and OSHA regulations.

7. Advise the Center Director of safety and health concerns.

8. Facilitate required Occupational Safety and Health Committee meetings; retain meeting minutes for three years and make them available upon request.

9. Coordinate with other safety and health staff (e.g., nurse, maintenance supervisor, CTT/education instructors, and others) to ensure a safe and healthful environment in which to live, work, and train.

10. Retain exposure monitoring results on center for 30 years in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.

R4. Imminent Danger

Imminent danger exists when a condition or practice presents a danger that could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm. If such a situation exists and is observed, the student(s) and staff in danger must be immediately removed from the area and not permitted to return until the problem is corrected. The center Safety Officer must immediately notify the Center Director of the hazard and recommend corrective action.

The Center Director must take appropriate action(s) to correct the hazard. If the hazard cannot be corrected promptly by the center, the Center Director must consult the appropriate Regional Office and/or the Office of Job Corps for advice and assistance in correcting the hazard. The action recommended by the center Safety Officer and the resulting action taken must be documented in writing and maintained on center for a period of three years.

R5. Required Inspections and Observations

a. All occupational safety and health inspections and observations must be:

1. Conducted by appropriate center staff in accordance with 29 CFR 1960.25 and DLMS 4 Chapter 800, paragraph 825

2. Submitted according to Exhibit 5-2, Plan and Report Submission Requirements

3. The responsibility of the center Safety Officer, managers, supervisors, and instructors

4. Documented and maintained on center for a period of five years, then destroyed

b. Observations on a daily basis, and weekly or monthly inspections are required for all center:

1. Buildings

2. Facilities

3. Career Technical Training (CTT) facilities including tool inventory, accountability, and security procedures

4. Career Technical Skills Training (CTST) projects including tool inventory, accountability, and security procedures

5. Academic classrooms and other learning/study areas

6. Cafeterias

7. Dormitories

8. Health services

9. Administrative offices

10. Recreation areas

11. Gymnasiums

12. Swimming pools

13. Child development center facilities, including playgrounds

14. Equipment

15. Vehicles used to transport students

Identified deficiencies must be corrected promptly. Weekly and monthly inspections, and hazards identified during daily observations, must be documented. Records of inspections and actions taken to correct deficiencies must be maintained by the center Safety Officer for three years, and made available upon request.

c. Daily Observations

1. Food service supervisors must check food preparation and food serving areas of cafeterias.

2. Residential advisors/residential counselors must check dormitories, snack bars, and canteens and document their findings in a logbook.

3. The center Safety Officer, and CTT and academic managers/instructors, must check classrooms/shops (including CTST projects); tool inventory, accountability, and security procedures; motor vehicles; and all equipment to be used by students and staff.

4. Child development supervisors must check the child development center, equipment, toys, and the playground.

5. Recreation supervisors/staff must check the gymnasium, exercise equipment, and other frequently used recreation areas.

d. Weekly Inspections

The center Safety Officer must inspect:

1. All food service facilities, including cafeterias, culinary arts facilities, snack bars, and canteens

2. Gymnasiums, exercise equipment, and swimming pools during times of operation

3. CTT facilities and CTST projects including tool inventory, accountability, and security procedures

e. Monthly Inspections

The center Safety Officer must inspect:

1. Dormitories

2. Child development centers

3. CTT facilities and CTST projects (see Chapter 3, Section 3.1, R4​) including tool inventory, accountability, and security procedures

4. Academic classrooms

5. Health services

6. Administrative offices, warehouses, and other buildings occupied by students and staff

f. Quarterly Inspections

Centers must arrange for quarterly environmental health inspections by qualified non-center personnel in the following areas:

1. Food service facilities

2. Residential facilities

3. Training facilities

4. Educational facilities, including offices, classrooms, recreational facilities, and wellness center

5. Water supply and distribution facilities, when not a part of municipal systems

6. Wastewater treatment facilities, except for septic systems, which must be inspected annually, and municipal sewer systems, which are exempt from this requirement

7. Child development centers, where appropriate

Centers must submit quarterly environmental health reports and necessary corrective action, simultaneously, to the Regional Office and the National Office of Job Corps within seven days of receipt (see Exhibit 5-2, Plan and Report Submission Requirements).

g. CTST and Other Projects

The center Safety Officer and appropriate instructor must inspect all CTST projects daily. The appropriate instructor must ensure full tool inventory, accountability, and security, ensuring that all tools are accounted for before the end of each class, or the end of each day if off-site, and ensuring that all tools that are unaccounted for are found and all tools are secured. The center Safety Officer must inspect and approve all final CTST projects, on and off center, before site occupancy and project completion.

Inspection checklists, photographs, tool inventory lists, and associated corrective actions must be maintained on center indefinitely and made available upon request.

R6. Occupational Safety and Health Facility Survey (Preoccupancy)

a. An Occupational Safety and Health Environmental Facility Survey (Preoccupancy) must be conducted before moving students into

1. a new center, dormitory, or classroom; or

2. a facility that has been renovated so as to change any building structural system or major mechanical, electrical, plumbing, egress, or fire and safety system.

b. Centers must contact the Regional Office (RO) Project Manager to schedule a preoccupancy survey 30 days prior to project completion.

c. The preoccupancy survey must be coordinated through the RO and conducted by the center Safety Officer and/or the Office of Job Corps. The Office of Job Corps will determine who will conduct the preoccupancy inspection.

d. Major deficiencies must be corrected before occupancy.

e. The survey report will be distributed prior to occupancy, and it will be maintained by the National Office, Regional Office, and the center.

R7. Abatement Plans for Violations Identified in Annual Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program Review

a. Abatement Procedures and Time Frames

The following procedures must be followed by centers and Regional Offices (ROs) in responding to safety and health violations cited during annual safety and health reviews:

1. As part of the OSH Program Review, the center will receive a detailed verbal briefing regarding all hazards identified. The center must immediately begin to address those concerns. A log of the corrected item(s) must be maintained, indicating what action was taken, by whom, and the date of action.

2. The center and the RO will receive a formal OSH Program Review report from the National Office of Job Corps within 60 days of a review. Violations must be documented manually on Form DL1-2029, Notice of Unsafe or Unhealthful Condition, which is to be created by the center. The violations documented on the DL1-2029 are the same as those documented in the Abatement Tracking System (ATS), which is the web-based system designed to facilitate an information exchange between the reviewer, the RO, and the center, and to allow the National Office to monitor case status to ensure prompt and timely hazard abatement.

3. The roles of each ATS user are as follows:

(a) At the national level, the National Office inputs DL1-2029 center violation data into ATS and transmits the data to the RO to initiate tracking.

(b) At the regional level, both the Job Corps Regional Director and the center’s Project Manager are authorized to access ATS to view new cases transmitted from the National Office and centers’ abatement responses. Either individual in the RO can transmit the DL1-2029 in ATS to the Job Corps center. The RO can edit the center response and can close out the case only after all violations have been abated.

(c) At the center level, the Center Director and the center Safety Officer are authorized to access ATS to view new cases transmitted from the RO and can respond to violations. Most violations should be abated within 30 days. If abatement is not completed, an abatement plan is required. Centers can indicate in ATS whether the response is a corrective action or an abatement plan. Funding requests can also be indicated. After the center transmits the response electronically to the RO, the RO will determine whether to accept the abatement response in part or in whole.

ATS is not capable of providing users e-mail notification, so the system should be checked frequently.

b. Posting Requirements

Official response to violations noted during the occupational safety and health review occurs via ATS.  A copy of the paper DL1-2029, which must be created by the center, is to be posted by the center at or near each place where an unsafe or unhealthful condition is referred to in the notice. It must remain posted until all violations cited are abated, or for three training days, whichever is longer.

R8. Hazardous Materials Management

Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding hazardous waste generation, storage, and disposal.

a. Centers that ship hazardous materials off center must comply with pre-transportation regulations.

b. Centers that store or handle hazardous materials, such as flammable/combustible materials, acids, caustics, compressed gases, oxidizers, etc., must comply with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 1910 Subpart Z and all applicable substance-specific standards.

c. Centers that use hazardous or toxic chemicals must comply with the regulations of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986.

d. Centers must notify the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Job Corps Regional Director, and the National Office of Job Corps Safety Team leader when a release of hazardous substance occurs. A release includes any discharge, spill, or leak into the air, water, or land, as required by 40 CFR 302.

e. Emergency response to a spill or leak of hazardous materials must be performed by the local hazardous materials response team or licensed contractor.

f. Chemical-specific information such as Safety Data Sheets (SDS) must be readily accessible to emergency response personnel.

R9. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)

Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in electrical transformers.

a. Centers that are using electrical equipment known to contain PCBs must register with the EPA’s Transformer Registration and PCB Activity Database. A copy of the registration certificate can be obtained from EPA and must be maintained on center indefinitely, and must be available for review upon request.

b. Centers must prepare an inventory of all center equipment, including transformers, capacitors, fluorescent lights and ballasts, and hydraulic oils that may contain PCBs.  The inventory must include the following:

1. Type of equipment, installation date, and manufacturer

2. Overall condition

3. Contact information for nearest PCB waste hauler

R10. Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)/Aboveground Storage Tanks (ASTs)

Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding underground storage tanks (UST) and aboveground storage tanks (AST). Each center operator, Center Director, and Safety Officer must coordinate to ensure that all USTs and ASTs comply with 40 CFR Parts 112 and 280, and all applicable state requirements.

R11. Lead

Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding lead-containing building materials.

Lead was a common paint additive used until 1978. Due to the age of many Job Corps center facilities, it is assumed that lead-based paint is present in buildings constructed prior to 1978 unless testing has proven otherwise. Centers that plan to disturb a surface that may contain lead must perform dust, air, and/or water sampling to determine the potential for exposure to lead. Centers in which there is a potential exposure to lead by students, staff, or young children (in child development or residential facilities) must develop a written lead-based paint compliance program that includes the following:

a. Designation and training of a competent person, capable of identifying existing and predictable lead hazards in the surroundings or working areas and having the authority to take prompt corrective action.

b. Procedures to ensure that all CTST projects involving construction work will be tested for lead prior to initiation. No student or staff may be exposed to lead at concentrations greater than 30 micrograms per cubic meter of air (30 ug/m3) averaged over an eight-hour period.

c. Procedures for notifying staff and students of the health hazards of lead-based paint. Inventory documentation must be maintained on center and with the Office of Job Corps and Regional Office Project Manager.

d. Appropriate hazard warning will be posted in all regulated areas.

e. Annual student and staff awareness training will be provided in accordance with the minimum requirements of 29 CFR 1926.62 and 1910.1025.

R12. Asbestos Operations and Maintenance

a. Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding asbestos-containing building materials (ACBM).

b. ACBM not immediately removed must be managed as part of an Asbestos Operations and Maintenance (O&M) program, in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.1001 and 40 CFR Part 763. Centers in which there are buildings containing ACBM must have an O&M program that includes the following:

1. Documentation, including copies of the initial asbestos survey report, subsequent ACBM surveys or inspection reports, and all asbestos abatement records, and laboratory analysis and exposure monitoring results, which must be maintained on center in a centralized asbestos record depository indefinitely, and made available upon request.

2. Designation of an Asbestos Coordinator who must be responsible for ensuring compliance with all asbestos regulations and policies. The designated Asbestos Coordinator must receive initial training in asbestos O&M within one month of appointment. Training must consist of a minimum of 16 hours of both classroom and practical asbestos O&M training provided by an EPA-accredited training provider.

3. Annual asbestos awareness training for all employees (including custodial and maintenance employees) and contract employees. Initial training must consist of a minimum of two hours of training within one week of hire.

4. Annual refresher training for the Asbestos Coordinator and all custodial/maintenance employees. Documentation of training must be maintained in the central asbestos record depository as well as the individual’s personnel file.

5. Notification of the presence of asbestos within center buildings to all students and employees at least annually through a written notice or posting of a statement in the common areas of all buildings containing asbestos. The notice must contain a brief description of the location and type of ACBM, and the name and contact information for the designated Asbestos Coordinator.

6. Posting of asbestos warning signs in all mechanical rooms, crawlspaces, custodial closets, or other work areas where maintenance or custodial employees may come into contact with ACBM. Warning signs must meet the requirements specified in 29 CFR 1910.1001, and must be posted so as to be visible immediately upon entering the room or workspace.

7. Inclusion of employees and contract employees working in areas where ACBM is present in the center’s respiratory protection program and medical surveillance program.

8. Inspection of all ACBM in center buildings at least twice each year to verify the physical condition and identify any significant damage. Evidence of significant damage and/or other deterioration in physical condition that presents a potential health hazard must be reported to the Office of Job Corps and Regional Office via the Significant Incident Reporting (SIR) System.

9. Repair or abatement of ACBM must be performed by licensed asbestos abatement contractors. Clean-up of damaged ACBM by Job Corps personnel is strictly prohibited.

10. Review and documentation of all CTST or center-managed renovation projects by the Asbestos Coordinator to ensure that no ACBM will be affected by the proposed project. The center’s Asbestos Coordinator will ensure that the proper warning signs are posted in the work area per 29 CFR 1910.1001.

R13. Hazard Communication

Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding chemical hazard communication. Each center operator, Center Director, and center Safety Officer must coordinate and ensure that hazards associated with the use of all chemicals produced or imported by chemical manufacturers or importers, and used by Job Corps students/staff, are evaluated. Such information concerning chemical hazards must be communicated to affected students and staff via a comprehensive written hazard communication program in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1200. The Center Director must ensure that the center Safety Officer or other designee structures the hazard communication program to include:

a. A complete chemical inventory or master list of chemical products used on center and a process to keep the inventory current. The inventory must include the name of the product and the location(s) where it is used. Ensure that students and staff know the location of the chemical inventory.

b. Organization and ongoing maintenance of Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) for all chemical products purchased by or used at the center. SDSs for chemical products used in a given area must be available to and easily accessible by all staff and students. SDSs can be stored in a three-ring binder or be accessible via computer.

c. Clearly readable identifying labels securely placed on all incoming containers of hazardous chemical products, and such labels are not removed or defaced. Chemicals transferred to other approved containers must be labeled accordingly as well.  Labels must contain at least:

1. Product identification

2. Hazard warning showing what parts of the body could be affected (Hazardous Materials Identification System (HMIS) or National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) system)

3. Name and address of the manufacturer or supplier

d. Supervisor/instructor maintenance of up-to-date SDS file for each hazardous chemical product used within their respective areas.

e. Proper training and instruction delivered to all users of hazardous chemical products, including:

1. Identification of such products

2. The specific hazards associated with such products

3. Measures that users can take to protect themselves (including PPE requirements)

4. Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of hazardous chemicals

5. Potential physical health effects of chemicals used in the workplace

f. Proper communication of chemical hazards associated with non-routine tasks.

g. An established and approved chemical products purchase list. SDSs must be reviewed by the center Safety Officer before the products are used in the workplace.

R14. Mercury

Centers must comply with EPA standards, 40 CFR Part 261, Hazardous Waste Identification Regulations, 40 CFR Part 273, Universal Waste Regulations, as well as state and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding mercury in fluorescent lamps and thermometers.

a. Each center operator, Center Director, and center Safety Officer must coordinate to ensure that all sources of mercury have been identified and are properly disposed of in accordance with the local/state health department or department of the environment regulations.

b. All mercury-containing paints, batteries, thermometers, blood pressure meters, thermostats, light ballasts, etc., currently in use should be replaced when it is fiscally possible. Center students/staff are strictly prohibited from attempting to clean up spills or releases.  Clean-up must be performed by the local fire department, hazmat team, or a licensed contractor.

R15. Freon 113 and Other Ozone-Depleting Chemicals

a. Centers must comply with federal, state, and local regulations and Job Corps policy regarding Freon 113 and other ozone-depleting chemicals in the replacement and disposal of air conditioning and refrigeration units.

b. Air conditioning and refrigeration units installed before 1995 that may contain ozone-depleting chemicals must be disposed of in accordance with federal and state hazardous materials regulations.

R16. Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI))

Centers must comply with OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.1026 and Job Corps policy regarding hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)).

a. Centers that offer trades that may potentially expose students/staff to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) must develop, implement, and maintain an exposure control plan that contains the following minimum requirements:

1. Trade(s) or center functions that may result in exposure

2. Exposure-monitoring results for the affected trade(s) or center functions

3. Engineering controls used to maintain Cr(VI) concentrations below the permissible exposure limit (PEL) and action level

4. Personal protective equipment (PPE) required during performance of training or center function

5. Method(s) of communicating hazards associated with Cr(VI) (See hazard communication training, Chapter 5, Section 5.9, R13.)

b. Centers offering the welding trade must perform one round of initial and confirmation exposure monitoring no matter how often welding of stainless steel occurs. No additional monitoring is necessary if both the initial and confirmation sample results are below the PEL of 5.0 µg/m3 and the action level of 2.5 µg/m3 calculated as eight-hour time-weighted averages (TWA).

c. Centers must maintain exposure monitoring results and product SDS on center for 30 years in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1910.1020.

R17. Pest Control

Centers must:

a. Take adequate measures to control insects and rodents in all areas. Only pesticides that are safe for use in food service areas shall be used in food service facilities.

b. Ensure that pesticides are applied only by a licensed professional pest control contractor in food service, residential, and education facilities. The following information must be obtained from the contractor and kept on file for at least three years:

1. Name/type of chemicals used

2. Amount of chemical applied

3. Areas where applied and amount specific to location

4. Date when applied

5. Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) for the chemicals used

c. Ensure that pesticides are not stored for usage on centers except those that are approved by EPA for use in landscaping and gardening projects. Proper training on storage, use, and application of these chemicals must be provided to staff and students.

R18. Unsanitary Conditions

In accordance with Section 5(a) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, centers must ensure that staff and students are not required or permitted to reside, work, be trained, or receive services in buildings or surroundings that are unsanitary, hazardous, or lack proper ventilation.

R19. Water Treatment

Centers must ensure that when non-municipal water and waste treatment facilities are used, the following requirements are met:

a. Water supplies meet center needs and satisfy National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (40 CFR 142).

b. Prior to construction or renovation, the standards or regulations of federal, state, and local health authorities are consulted. Renovation/building plans and specifications are sent to the National Office of Job Corps, with a copy to the Regional Office, for review.

c. Records are maintained showing the amount of water treated, amount of chlorine used, daily free chlorine residual, and other data pertaining to water treatment.

d. All required bacterial and chemical tests are performed by state or local health authorities, with the exception of the daily routine residual chlorine test that is to be conducted by center staff.

e. The center complies with the water quality and related standards of the state and with the standards established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq​.

f. Records are maintained documenting the water/wastewater treatment pursuant to standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and local authorities and should be maintained on center indefinitely. Waste treatment problems are brought to the attention of the appropriate EPA coordinator and the Regional Office.

g. Records of influent and effluent monitoring data are maintained as required by the plant’s effluent discharge permit and other data pertaining to wastewater treatment.

h. The analysis of all influent and effluent, as required by the discharge permit, is performed by a certified laboratory.

R20. Student Injury, Occupational Illness/Disease, and Fatality Recordkeeping

Occupational illness/disease in this context is defined as illness or disease acquired from/due to the Job Corps training and/or living environment (e.g., hearing loss, coronary/vascular condition, asbestos-related illness, carpal tunnel syndrome, etc.).

Student injuries and occupational illnesses/diseases must be documented in the Department of Labor’s Employees’ Compensation Operations and Management Portal (ECOMP). ECOMP is an electronic database that assists the Department in meeting the reporting requirements of both the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs (OWCP).  The only injuries and occupational illnesses/diseases that should not be documented in ECOMP are those that occur while the student is:

at home on pass or leave

engaged in leisure time employment, or

in an Unauthorized Absence (UA) status.

Regardless of the severity of the injury or occupational illness/disease, an incident will minimally require the submission, in ECOMP, of the two documents below:

a. The OSHA 301, Injury and Illness Incident Report

b. One of the forms below:

1. OWCP CA-1, Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Compensation

2. OWCP CA-2, Notice of Occupational Disease and Claim for Compensation (The CA-2 submission is rarely used; if you think a CA-2 is warranted, contact the National Office.)

Student fatalities are not documented in ECOMP. These incidents should be reported to the National Office of Job Corps immediately. Centers are required to complete the OWCP CA-6 manual form. The National Office will complete any other recordkeeping requirement.

A complete list of the OSHA and OWCP forms, and a description of their use, are below. Please note that all occupational safety and health records must be maintained for a five-year period, unless otherwise indicated by a specific OSHA standard, the Department of Labor Manual Series (DLMS), or the Program Requirements Handbook (PRH).

​Electronic Forms Submitted in ECOMP

a. OSHA 301, Injury and Illness Incident Report, is completed in ECOMP for each student injury or occupational illness in accordance with 29 CFR 1904. The OSHA form is required to be retained for five years.

b. OSHA 300, Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: For OSHA 301 Incident Reports that are work-related (see definition in criterion 1, below), centers must maintain a single current log in ECOMP, known as the OSHA 300 Log. For an incident to be entered in the OSHA 300 Log, it must meet each of the three OSHA-recordable criteria below:

1. The injury or occupational illness is work-related. For Job Corps purposes, this means that the injury or occupational illness occurred while the student was involved in training or educational activities.

2. The injury or occupational illness represents a new case in the system. 

3. The injury or occupational illness results in one or more of the following:

(a) Days away from work (training or educational activities)

(b) Restricted work or transfer to another job

(c) Medical treatment beyond first aid

(d) Loss of consciousness

(e) A significant injury or illness diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional

(f) A needlestick or sharp injury exposing the student to another person’s blood or potentially infectious material

(g) A Standard Threshold Shift (STS) in hearing in one or both ears where the employee’s total hearing level is at least 25 decibels above audiometric zero in the same ear(s) as the STS

(h) Exposure to persons with a case of active tuberculosis (TB), where the student subsequently develops a TB infection.

​Student injuries resulting from horseplay while engaged in training or educational activities must also be recorded. Any student injury must be recorded in the OSHA 300 Log in ECOMP.

​The OSHA 300 Log is required to be retained for five years.

c. CA-1, Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Compensation, is completed in ECOMP within seven calendar days of supervisor notification.

In the event that an injury requires separation from Job Corps, center staff must obtain Office of Job Corps approval prior to forwarding a CA-1 to OWCP. When the CA-1 is filed with OWCP at separation, a CA-16 manual form, Authorization for Examination and/or Medical Treatment, and an OWCP-1500 manual form, the Health Insurance Claim Form, are sent to the provider. If the injury is not severe enough to cause separation, the CA-1 should be completed, electronically filed in ECOMP within seven calendar days of supervisor notification, printed, signed by the student, and filed in the student’s health folder.

d. CA-2, Notice of Occupational Disease and Claim for Compensation, is rarely used in Job Corps because there are very few cases of occupational disease or illness related to enrollment in Job Corps. If such a situation does occur, contact the Office of Job Corps before filing a CA-2.

​Manual Forms

a. CA-6, Official Supervisor's Report of Employee’s Death, is filed with the OWCP district office if a student dies as a result of an illness/injury incurred while in performance of duty. In the event of a student fatality, the Center Director must notify OWCP immediately by telephone, email, or fax, and mail the CA-6 to the OWCP district office.  Do not document student fatalities in ECOMP.

The Center Director must report student fatalities to the National and Regional Offices within six hours of the event via Significant Incident Report (SIR).

b. CA-7, Claim for Compensation Due to Traumatic Injury or Occupational Disease: Unlike other federal employees, Job Corps students are not eligible for continuation of pay for 45 days. However, they may submit a CA-7 after medical separation to receive compensation for injury or illness. The center must complete the CA-7 and have the student sign and date Section 7 of the form.  In the event that the student is unable to sign the CA-7, the Center Director may sign as his or her authorized representative.

Upon Office of Job Corps approval to forward a CA-1 or CA-2 to OWCP in ECOMP, the center must fax or e-mail a copy of the completed CA-7 to the Office of Job Corps for submission to OWCP. The Office of Job Corps must file the copy sent to them by the center with OWCP within five days of the student’s signature.

The original CA-7, signed by the student, should be filed in the student’s health folder.

c. CA-16, Authorization for Examination and/or Treatment: Whenever a student separates from Job Corps and needs examination and/or treatment as a result of traumatic injury, the Center Director should issue a CA-16 to the physician or medical facility. This form authorizes the injured student's examination and/or treatment from a physician or medical facility. When a CA-2 is electronically submitted to OWCP in cases of separation because of work-related illness or disease, a CA-16 is issued only if prior approval is obtained from OWCP.  If a CA-16 is submitted, do not submit a CA-20.

This form provides OWCP with an initial medical report and the physician or medical facility with a billing form for emergency treatment. Issuance of the CA-16 authorizes OWCP to pay medical expenses incurred.

Part A is completed by the student’s supervisor and submitted to the physician or medical facility within 48 hours of examination and/or treatment. Part B is completed by the attending physician as promptly as possible after initial examination and sent to the appropriate OWCP district office.

When there is a need for medical follow-up for the work-related injury by a second health-care provider, the center must email/mail the name and address of that provider to OWCP or instruct the student (in writing) to do so.

d. OWCP-1500 (also known as HCFA-1500)—Health Insurance Claim Form:

This form accompanies the CA-16 to all medical care providers, except hospitals.

It is issued by health-care providers to bill the OWCP district office for services rendered.

e. CA-20, Attending Physician’s Report: This report provides medical support of claims for compensation. It is submitted to OWCP upon completion of the medical examination and treatment. It is also used to provide additional medical information regarding the claim.  If a CA-20 is submitted, do not submit a CA-16.

R21. Definitions and Procedures for Handling Job Corps Student Injuries

a. Job Corps Injuries Designated as First Aid

1. First aid is defined as any one-time treatment, and any follow-up visit for the purpose of observation, of minor scratches, cuts, burns, or splinters, which does not ordinarily require medical care. Such one-time treatment and follow-up visits are considered first aid even if they are provided by a physician or other registered professional personnel.

2. First aid injuries must be documented in ECOMP.

3. The following procedures are generally considered first aid treatment (e.g., one-time treatment and subsequent observation of minor injuries):

(a) Application of antiseptics during initial visit to medical personnel

(b) Treatment of first degree burn(s)

(c) Application of bandage(s) during any visit to medical personnel

(d) Use of elastic bandage(s) during initial visit to medical personnel

(e) Removal of foreign bodies from wound if procedure is uncomplicated (e.g., by tweezers or other simple technique)

(f) Use of nonprescription medications and administration of single dose of prescription medication on initial visit for minor injury or discomfort

(g) Soaking therapy on initial visit to medical personnel or removal of bandages by soaking

(h) Application of hot or cold compress(es) during first visit to medical personnel

(i) Application of ointments to abrasions to prevent drying or cracking

(j) Application of heat therapy during first visit to medical personnel

(k) Negative x-ray diagnosis

(l) Observation of injury during visit to medical personnel

4.The administration of a tetanus shot or booster by itself is not considered medical treatment. However, these shots are often given in conjunction with more serious injuries; consequently, injuries requiring these shots may be filed in ECOMP for other reasons.

b. More Serious Injuries Not Resulting in Student Separation

1. This category includes injuries that result in medical treatment beyond first aid, and are serious enough to need a specialized referral but do not require a medical separation.

2. An example of this type of injury would be a student sustained a strain or sprain, but is able to continue training with restrictions.

3. These injuries must be documented in ECOMP. Some examples of this category of injury are:

(a) Fractures

(b) Head injuries with loss of consciousness

(c) Positive x-ray diagnosis

(d) Lacerations with nerve or tendon damage

(e) Injuries needing sutures/Steri-Strips/adhesive butterfly

(f) Foreign body embedded in the eye

(g) Jaw fractures/dental damage

(h) Treatment of infection

(i) Treatment of 2nd or 3rd-degree burns

(j) Food poisoning

(k) Dislocated shoulder

c. Injuries Resulting in Separation from Job Corps

1. This category includes injuries resulting in the student’s death or serious injuries that result in the student’s separation from Job Corps.

2. An example of this type of injury would be: a student sustained a traumatic injury in the performance of duty that requires surgery, additional medical treatment that cannot be provided on center, or the student can no longer perform in the program.

3. These injuries must be documented in ECOMP.

4. Section 8143 of the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA) states that while students are enrolled in Job Corps, students are considered employees of the federal government for purposes of medical coverage under FECA. The performance of duty does not include an act of an enrollee while absent from his or her assigned post of duty, except while participating in an activity (including an activity while on pass or during travel to or from the post of duty) authorized by or under the direction and supervision of Job Corps.

R22. Staff Injury, Occupational Illness/Disease, and Fatality Recordkeeping

Staff is defined as all contractors, federal employees, and temporary employees who work at a Job Corps center.

All work-related staff injuries and occupational illnesses must be documented in the Department of Labor’s Employees’ Compensation Operations and Management Portal (ECOMP) in accordance with 29 CFR 1960 Subpart I and 29 CFR 1904.  These regulations require that a single OSHA 300 Log be maintained for each federal agency establishment; each Job Corps center is classified as an establishment. As such, all work-related injuries and occupational illnesses suffered by federal employees and contractors at the establishment must be captured on the same OSHA 300 Log. This requirement has no bearing on the requirements of the corporate office or other federal agency.

Centers are only required to report the death of a staff member if the fatality occurs while in duty status on or off-center. The Center Director must report staff deaths to the National and Regional Offices within six hours of the event via Significant Incident Report (SIR).

A CA-1 or CA-2 is never completed for staff in the Department of Labor’s ECOMP.

a. OSHA 301, Injury and Illness Incident Report, is completed in ECOMP for each staff injury or occupational illness in accordance with 29 CFR 1904. The OSHA form is required to be retained for five years.

b. OSHA 300, Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: All centers must maintain a single current log in ECOMP of all work-related accidents, injuries, and occupational illnesses incurred by students and staff in accordance with 29 CFR 1904.  The OSHA 300 Log is required to be retained for five years.

Staff injuries resulting from horseplay while engaged in work-related tasks or activities must also be recorded. Any staff injury must be recorded in ECOMP.

R23. OSHA Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses

Each year, Job Corps centers are required to post OSHA Form 300A, also called the OSHA 300A Summary, from February 1 through April 30 in accordance with 29 CFR 1904.32​. OSHA Form 300A summarizes data contained in the OSHA 300 Log, which is maintained electronically in ECOMP, for the calendar year just prior to posting for the purpose of notifying students and staff of the injuries that have occurred on center. This report may be generated through ECOMP reports.

Following the required three-month posting period, the OSHA 300A must be retained for five years.


 

 Exhibits

 
  
Exhibit 5-2 Plan and Report Submission Requirements
Exhibit 5-4 Required Staff Training
 

 Legal/CFR Requirements

 
  
29 CFR 1904
29 CFR 1904.32
29 CFR 1910
29 CFR 1910.1001
29 CFR 1910.1020
29 CFR 1910.1025
29 CFR 1910.1026
29 CFR 1910.1200
29 CFR 1926
29 CFR 1926.62
29 CFR 1960
29 CFR 1960.25
40 CFR Part 112
40 CFR Part 142
40 CFR Part 261
40 CFR Part 273
40 CFR Part 280
40 CFR Part 302
40 CFR Part 763
Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act
OSH Act of 1970
Federal Water Pollution Control Act